Epic steals the show

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations, and communities.

Welcome y’all! Many parts of the world are starting to de-escalate from the severe quarantine we’ve all been living in. To be honest, it feels great to be able to go on a walk even if I still can’t see my friends and family. Things got bad here in Spain.

Moving on to the Metaverse where quarantine wasn’t a thing. There have been 2 main topics. One is the eternal “VR is dead” discussion. Do people even look at the numbers we have or even try any of the popular headsets?

But there’s little doubt that what everyone has been talking about is that incredible Unreal Engine 5 demo on a PS5. It shook the tech world. And it’s not just the graphic fidelity but the new pipeline it enables for content creators. Epic Games are dead serious about building the Metaverse.

On the news

  • Epic Games going at full throttle: The most talked about thing this week is Unreal Engine 5. It provides an important leap for creators, allowing you to just drop the highest quality assets and the engine itself will worry about loading it accordingly to each platform. But it’s also a giant leap in graphic quality, able to load these high-quality assets on next-gen consoles and high-end PCs with a new global illumination system. The video of a demo running on the PS5 has left us speechless.

    Retroactive to 2020, creators don’t need to start paying Epic until their first $1M in revenue, which is a great deal.

    If that wasn’t enough, the cross-platform online services they developer for Fortnite are now widely available. That means support for PCs and current-gen consoles. Mobile platforms are coming soon. An interesting feature is the unified cross-platform friend list. It’s also P2P and supports cloud game saves. Last but not least, the SDK is compatible with all the popular engines including Unity. [Link 1] [Link 2]

  • Spatial is free for some time due to the pandemic: A much talked about remote work solution can now be used unlimitedly. I haven’t had a chance to try it, but it supports all VR and AR headsets including the Quest, and can even be used from the browser. I’ve heard people mention the latter is quite buggy still. I’ve been quite excited about Spatial for a while as its features and possibilities seem to be ahead of its competition. [Link]

  • A new Oculus Quest could come sooner than expected: A Bloomberg report says that it was expected for the end of 2020 and has been pushed to early 2021. It will be a smaller and lighter headset with a more recent chipset that might mean an increased framerate. New controllers are also in the picture. I’m all in for this and can’t wait. The hardware gets better every year, and as long as they maintain software forward and backward compatibility, I couldn’t be more on board of higher frequent hardware updates. [Link]

  • Oculus Quest content reaches $100M and hand tracking available to all: Oculus just announced that all content sales have reached a whopping total of $100M. And that’s in under a year. Yes, VR is still niche. But it’s growing at an increasing pace. The Quest has changed the landscape and pushed VR forward several years. Hand tracking is now available with the latest update and there’s going to be more and more content on the store to support it. This is just one more way that Quest is becoming more accessible. [Link]

Food for thought

  • Joshua Topolsky replies to himself and the NYT, now a VR believer: He was one of those who couldn’t help write a sensationalist piece on “VR is dead”, but has now backtracked. After that NYT column which was written based on using an Oculus Go, Joshua dissected it explaining that you can’t have an opinion of the VR space without at least trying a Quest. He moves on to say that Quest has changed his perception of VR. An accessible and affordable device with decent content and the possibilities offered by 6DOF changes the market. This change in perception seems to be quite general. A lot of people in my Twitter feed that are not from the VR space now tweet frequently about VR thanks to Quest. [Link]

  • Benedict Evans suggests VR might be very far away from an “iPhone Moment”: It’s a different perspective from the status quo in the VR community. Benedict feels there are signs that VR, in its current form, has a hard cap in market share as a percentage of the gaming industry. It’s not a small market, but it’s on a different order of magnitude from PCs or smartphones. The main possible reason being the form factor. Maybe VR needs a neural implant or to become a slim pair of glasses that also does AR to fully become ubiquitous. He believes we don’t know what to build beyond games with VR’s current form factor while at the same time acknowledging that we’re waiting for better text legibility and input, and more comfortable headsets. These things seem likely to happen in <5 years and there is a clear path to them. Even text input if we use existing keyboards or our smartphones to type. The creativity in the VR space is vast and the bar for a decent VR application or game keeps on raising. Isolating ourselves from the world does have its cons, but in many situations, like the present quarantine, it also has many pros. An endless editable space is surely useful. It might be that we need a new approach to the hardware like the iPhone was to smartphones, but I have little doubt VR will be useful and move beyond games in the mid-term. [Link]

  • Bigscreen saves VC money for the long haul: In a short thread, Darshan, the CEO, comments they’ve been careful with hiring even though they received a total of $14M in investment rounds. The VR space is still far away from being a big market and reaching its “iPhone moment” so they’re taking a conservative approach to making sure they’re still here when the time comes. Darshan adds they still haven’t touched their Series A money. This is surely the best approach for a VR startup and I commend Darshan for thinking things thoroughly. [Link]

  • Vice made a short documentary on partying during quarantine: The reporter tries a whole bunch of different experiences from Zoom calls to Second Life to VR Chat. Even if VR Chat is weird and creepy often, this video proved to me, that at least for this use case, VR is ahead of all other existing options. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • WebXR locomotion tutorial: Ada, from Samsung, has written yet another useful tutorial for us WebXR peeps out there. This is a cool teleportation technique, from start to finish, using Three.JS, tween.js, and the WebXR API. It mimics the effect from Google Earth VR where you first select where you want to teleport, then the field of view shrinks and finally applies smooth locomotion to take you there. [Link]

  • Make presentations in WebXR with FRAME: You can make 3D scenes in the form of a presentation with multiuser support. Send a link and that’s it. [Link]

Interesting Meetups & Communities

  • Microsft MR Dev Days in Altspace: By simply registering beforehand you’ll be able to attend the whole event in Altspace. It makes total sense as they did buy Altspace, but it’s still great to see large corporations betting on VR for virtual conferences. Due to timezone problems, I hope to at least attend the keynote. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

Can VR grasp this opportunity?

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations and communities.

Events continue to move fully online and Metaverse prospective platforms are getting ready for it. This year’s edition of GDC has been the latest to move to a virtual format and Fortnite has broken records once again with a Travis Scott concert attended by 12.3M concurrent people. This is pushing the boundaries of different technologies and platforms in ways their makers hadn’t imagined or didn’t expect to happen so soon. There are some awesome examples in the newsletter today.

VR continues to grow at an increasing pace. Oculus Quest is now starting to become easier to find worldwide after the manufacturing shortages. I just hope we didn’t miss too much of the momentum behind Half Life: Alyx and the quarantine. But if we did and we missed this growth spike, the general trend is still looking great.

Read ahead for all the cool things people are making and saying. Stay safe, we’re here for the long haul!

On the news

  • Dreams PSVR support almost here: There are amazing creations in Dreams and the question on all our minds is when is it coming to PSVR. And the answer is real soon. It’s now in the last development phase. What seems like the best 3D/game creation tool will be greatly enhanced by VR native interactions. Amazing creation tools are the main missing link to make the Metaverse happen. [Link]

  • Late night talk show in Animal Crossing: People breaking boundaries yet again. A screenwriter from Star Wars, Gary Whitta, is launching a Twitch stream from Animal Crossing and talking over his character moving in the game. I love the creativity here, it’s definitely something I’m sure the creators of AC didn’t expect their game to be used for. It’s probably not the ideal platform for this, but it is the platform many are going to so they can relax a bit from quarantine life. [Life]

  • Mozilla Hubs Cloud is live: Extremely exciting feature from the Hubs team. Easy configuration of your own personalized Hubs server. It currently works only with AWS, but they’re working on Digital Ocean next. This is a major step for people to easily create their custom multiuser virtual environments. They have a stable product that’s been working great for a lot of use cases and now we can all build on top of it. [Link]

  • Finland holds a VR concert for 700k people in a virtual Helsinki: Their big May Day celebration in Helsinki was cancelled, so they turned to VR company Zoan that’s been building an exact virtual replica of Helsinki for 5 years. They organized a virtual concert in it with people acting live with a green screen. Attendees could even join in from a browser and use VR. This is one of the coolest and most polished uses of VR and virtual worlds that I’ve seen to date. It’s a glimpse into the future. [Link]

  • Steam users with a VR headset reaches 2M: Likely thanks to Half Life: Alyx, and possibly the quarantine, the percentage of Steam users with a compatible headset grew from 1.29% in March to 1.91% in April. This is roughly 2M users from a rough estimate made by UploadVR. It’s a really big increase in just one month, and many have been Oculus Quests. I expect this larger monthly growth numbers to keep up through the rest of the year as VR network effects and great content come into play. [Link]

Food for thought

  • The NYT asks itself why VR is still so niche during the covid crisis: The reporter attempts to try VR again, but was only able to grab hold of an Oculus Go. I also believe your first experience can make or break VR for you, and there’s not a lot of options on Go. Social VR also doesn’t do it for most of us, we don’t like talking with random people doing random things. He did enjoy relaxing apps like Nature Treks VR, which I’ve been using to disconnect during the quarantine too.

    The main answer for the VR market not growing faster is clearly not enough headsets being produced. It’s a shame this opportunity was missed, but there’s no way to fix that now. I’m still an optimist. The market continues to grow, the content is getting better and better and I have high hopes for the next 2 years. [Link]

  • Architects discuss the design of Half Life Alyx: In a recently uploaded live conversation, architects C. Fredrik V. Hellberg (Space Popular) & Andreea Ion Cojocaru (NUMENA) talk with Kent Bye about the architecture and design of Alyx. It’s a 2h long conversation that I’m sure will be worth your time. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • Stream into Zoom from Mozilla Hubs: Liv Erickson has built a green screen studio room and worked on a setup to stream into a Zoom call from it. It’s a great experiment aligned with the work done by SPACES, but from Hubs and more DIY. [Link]

  • Shopify experimenting with AR: They’ve recently launched a couple pretty cool experiments. One is size.link, which lets you set the sizes for a box and see how something of that size would look in your space. The other one is Wayfinding for stores. It’s really cool to see so many companies betting on the space. [Link]

  • Facebook working on VR text entry called PinchType: It’s a highly experimental system that only manages to reach 13 words per minute. But innovation on this front is still necessary. PinchType is based on assigning a group of letters to each finger, and you tap your fingers using finger tracking. A ML algorithm then detects, based on the context, which word you meant. [Link]

  • Aardvark lets you add AR widgets to your VR experiences: They’ve launched a Chromium-based application that loads what they call Gadgets made with their React library. Their application then loads these widgets into whatever VR applications you may be in. I haven’t had a chance to try it yet, but the video shows an example of Aardvark working with the SteamVR Home. I love the idea of integrating into existing apps seamlessly, that’s the right move to reach adoption. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

We're stuck at home for a while

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations and communities.

I found a great meme today that said: “There are 15 days left. It doesn’t matter when you ready this”. We’ve been in strict confinement for over 5 weeks now here in Spain and it’s starting to feel that way. I hope everyone is well and I want to share my appreciation to all those doing their part to keep us safe and also those who keep us entertained.

It’s been a slow couple weeks news wise, but some really cool things have happened in the Metaverse. Take this birthday party in Hubs:

I’ve seen Zoom weddings, but Dan has definitely pushed Hub’s capabilities to have the best possible birthday while confined. Events continue to happen in VR, we’re still thinking about the hard problems and time continues to move forward. Read ahead some of the most interesting things I’ve found.

I wish you all the best and see you again soon!

Food for thought

  • Maybe Fortnite will organically evolve into the Metaverse: The Washington Post gets into the Metaverse conversation starting with Fortnite. It’s true that it’s the current popular place to hang out online, but I saw a great tweet that I can’t find that if Fortnite were to become mainstream, the cool kids would move on to another platform. I think most will agree that the Metaverse needs to be open for anyone to create what they need, and unless Fornite opens up and develops the creation tools, it will just be one other silo on the Internet. [Link]

  • Mixed Reality privacy threats: Diane Hosfelt at Mozilla has written a great document that summarizes the possible privacy threats from data collected by MR applications. She makes the important point that companies are not obliged to think about all the ethical issues around their products. It’s up to us to educate the public about the risks of using MR software an the danger is as high as it’s ever been. [Link]

  • Mozilla Hubs’ master plan: Greg Fodor has published on Medium an updated version of the ideas behind how Hubs is pushing for the open Metaverse. Based on a document previously on Github, it outlines how the Metaverse needs to make use of the Web’s features (URLs, cross-platform support..) and add some extra things like 3D creation tools and easy to set up servers to host our content. I’m confident on how well that team understands the needs of the platform. They always seem to be focusing on exactly the most important feature at each point in team. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • Unity WebXR exporter gets an update: It has been updated to support WebXR. This could be a great way for non-Web developers to get started with WebXR and easily publish their creations in a very accessible way. [Link]

  • Treasure hunt in Mozilla Hubs: They made a treasure hunt virtual world for their 6 year old niece. It’s a really creative use of Hubs and they ended up having a whole family experience, love it! [Link]

Interesting Meetups & Communities

  • Gamesbeat Summit 2020, talk on the Metaverse: Gamesbeat Summit is also moving to a digital format and will be hosting a talk on the Metaverse. Panelists will be Philip Rosedale of High Fidelity, Matthew Ball of Epyllion Industries, Raph Koster of Playable Worlds, Frederic Descamps of Manticore Games, and moderator Sam Englebardt of Galaxy Interactive. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

Coronavirus brings technology to the forefront

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations and communities.

Hey hey! I hope you’re staying at home! After a month long hiatus, it’s great to be back. A massive amount of work and having to sort out my living situation for this dreadful crisis has had me way too busy. At least the rest of the metaverse hasn’t stopped, on the contrary, it’s seizing this opportunity to pick up speed.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve noticed everyone around me getting up to speed with technology. Suddenly, everyone now gets all these applications that have been around for a while. Or they discover random features like Google Search’s AR mode. From kids to the elderly, technology has conquered further grounds in our day to day lives. Zoom’s market cap is now over all US airlines. And they went from 10M daily users to 200M in 3 months. It’s crazy. The Internet can’t keep and many services are having to throttle their downloads and streaming.

With its challenges, VR platforms are also upping their game. For example, we’ve seen blogs suggest top apps for remote work, physical events have moved to VR and many more have decided to give this VR virtual events thing a go, and then it’s proving to be a provider of freedom to our new confinement living state. Even my non-VR Twitter is tweeting frequently about how they’re using their headsets. Half Life: Alyx launching and reaching top sales on Steam is a another important push. What is disappointing is that this context that’s generating so much interest in VR coincides with none of the major headsets being available for purchase. It’s definitely affecting many impulse buys.

With that, I’ll leave you with some of the most exciting VR things I’ve found over the last few weeks. Stay home and stay safe!

On the news

  • With events cancelled in the physical world, VR events declare it’s there turn: Over the last month, many large events have been organise in VR. Most of these were intended to happen in VR from the beginning, but others like Vive’s anual conference and IEEE decided to try out VR after having to cancel their real world event. It’s a great chance for VR to prove its worth and many Social VR company are grabbing onto the opportunity. I haven’t been able to attend yet, but from what I see on my timeline, they’re being really successful. [Link]

  • Attention-based payments for WebXR sites: Mozilla and it’s Firefox Reality browser is launching an experiment supporting Coil. It works similar to Brave Browser where people pay a $5 monthly subscription, and then that money is sent, based on the time they spent on different sites, to the creators. Though we still need larger upfront payments, anything that will help reduce the importance of ad-based revenue. This is still a model that incentivizes spending as much time as possible on the Web which will trigger algorithms to prioritize extreme content. [Link]

  • Facebook buys studio behind Asgard’s Wrath: They continue to buy some of the most successful VR studios. The terms, again, haven’t been disclosed. I feel wary of seeing so many big VR efforts concentrated in a single company. It’s great to have a plurality of organizations trying out many different things in different directions. It’s still such early stages. VR is also a very powerful medium, and having a single company control so much of it is dangerous. If you’re reading this newsletter, I’m sure you’re not looking forward to a Facebook-owned metaverse. [Link]

  • Linden Lab sells Sansar: After announcing they would stop working on it, they’ve found a bidder. The buyer, Wookey Projects, seems to be a company that buys dying projects. I have my doubts that a company that’s not solely focused on the platform being able to make it successful, but let’s see. [Link]

  • +100 VR games have made $1M: Very important milestone as more and more VR developers can build profitable businesses. 7 of those have made >$10M. The software is improving, becoming more enticing, and there are more and more headset out there. Currently, it’s almost impossible to grab a headset from Oculus or Valve. [Link]

  • Native IPFS support on Opera: It’s the first browser to support a decentralized file system protocol. Opera might not be a very popular browser, but it’s still an important milestone. Other browsers like Brave and Firefox have also expressed interest. Native support allows developers to offer a better user experience with those protocols, making them more accessible. [Link]

  • 6D.ai has been bought by Niantic: The AR super company, a Google spin-off, continues to buy other promising companies in the AR space. 6D.ai is building very promising technologies to support the AR Cloud. I found them particularly interesting as their perspective seemed to come from a privacy-first point of view. They had mention before they wouldn’t sell out, so, while I’m very happy for their success, I do hope that mission will be kept at Niantic, unlike how Whatsapp was taken over at Facebook. [Link]

  • StriVR raises $30M: There aren’t big investment rounds in VR so it’s great to see companies doing big here. It generates excitement for the market, which then brings more money in which fosters innovation. StriVR is one of the largest B2B training platforms and has big partnerships with companies like Walmart. [Link]

Food for thought

  • VR isn’t ready to host an event like GDC: Liv Erikson is back on the newsletter with a great analysis on what’s left for macro events hosted in VR. It’s not just the technological aspects, but massive events with thousands of people on the Internet, where people ignore social norms and it’s hard to enforce them, is just looking for trouble. She advocated organising smaller more intimate events which I wholeheartedly agree on. [Link]

  • Crypto worlds getting searching for adoption: In the crypto community, a blog post came up also talking about the opportunity for Social VR worlds during a crisis like this. They have a sole focus on crypto platforms though. It is interesting to see a crypto person make the case for how the world is ready for VR. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • Join video calls from VR: SPACES, a VR location-based entertainment company, has built a tool that lets you jump into calls in Zoom, Hangouts and others. You get a whiteboard, your desktop and can see the faces of the others in the call. It’s an awesome idea that feels so obvious in hindsight. We still have so much creativity left to explore in VR. [Link]

  • Vircadia, another High Fidelity fork: There are multiple efforts to build on top of the amazing work done at High Fidelity. This one is maintained by volunteers instead of having a company supporting it. [Link]

  • Jumpy Balls, a WebXR game: Feiss from Mozilla has built a small game to demonstrate ECSY, an entity-component-system for the Web. It’s great to see more fun concepts on WebXR. [Link]

  • Multiuser WebXR whiteboard: Another great use case for WebXR. Easily jump into a multiuser room with colleagues with a link. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

The trimming of Social VR platforms

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations and communities.

Lots of things have happened over the last fortnight, specially in the Social VR space. More platforms are transitioning as they can’t find a viable business model in today’s market while others launch to keep on trying. We’ve also seen the largest in-VR conference that happened over multiple Social VR platforms at the same time. It’s a very important milestone and proves the utility and importance of these platforms. I don’t believe the idea in itself of Social VR will fade away, but the different platforms do need to understand what their main focus is (what problem they’re trying to solve) keeping in mind the current use case of XR and its market size.

There continue to be interesting projects and conversations happening in the space and I encourage you to read along to learn more about them!

On the news

  • Janus transitions to a community project: Like with other Social VR platforms, Janus hasn’t been able to figure things out in a financial sense. The VR market is quite small and general multiplayer applications with no specific use case are struggling to make ends meet. I’m quite sad about this as it’s also one of the most powerful WebXR platforms out there, the team is outstanding. Good thing is, as it was built on the Web and open source, they’ve been able to transition to a community project and keep all those wonderful creations live! This is a good argument in favour of the Web as an underlying platform for XR content, but also proves the good faith behind the Janus team. Thank you! [Link]

  • Sansar loses support from Linden Labs: A second round of lay-offs and further comments made by the company indicate that Linden Labs will no longer financially support Sansar. Another Social VR platform that is seeing it’s last few weeks. Linden do say that they are trying to search for other financial backers, but no further comment there. We’ll continue to see how this develops, but it seems like the timing just wasn’t right for pure Social VR. [Link]

  • Decentraland and Somnium Space 2.0 are live: As some platforms close, others continue to give it a go. These 2 are blockchain-based (Ethereum) platforms where you need to buy land or avatars. I’m not a big fan of limiting digital platforms in this way when the Web allows for infinite interconnected worlds for cheap, but there might be a use case. Decentraland definitely has the money and a decently sized community. Somnium has VR support and possibly more features. I wish them luck and will follow attentively how it goes. [Link]

  • The first massive conference in VR just happened: The Educators in VR International Summit, which I already talked about in this newsletter, happened last week. A 6 day conference that happened on multiple Social VR platforms 24h a day. What a feat. I think there’s no doubt that this is a viable solution today, so I expect to see in-VR events growing pretty quickly. [Link]

  • Magic Leap now wants to be more developer friendly: Magic Leap is finally making it easier for developers to get hold of a headset. They now have an application process to try to get one. They’re also holding private events at their HQ for developers. They’ve been shying away from getting too close to developers from the beginning as they have always been a very private company. That has also meant thought that many developers couldn’t afford to bet on their platform. I’m not sure if this will be enough. [Link]

  • Croquet, tool for multiuser application, launches: They’ve also announced a $2.7M round. Their SDK, with an important focus on XR, allows developers to build live collaboration applications. It seems to work for all kinds of use cases and data being shared between active users. This tooling is certainly critical and the space is starting to get crowded, we’ll have to see how it pans out. [Link]

Food for thought

  • The Digital Afterlife wants to help manage your digital assets after you pass away: Liv Erikson from Mozilla Hubs and others have started this very interesting project. Until the Internet, and specifically social media, our identity was tied mostly to government documents. Handling a person passing away was mostly up to the government. But now we have pieces of our identity, valuable data, spread out throughout many organizations in the digital realm. Social networks have set their own policy on what happens with an account after the owner passes away, but we need to think about this more carefully. We’re sharing more and more data, it will increase dramatically and get more personal with XR, and it can’t be up to specific private companies what happens with our data. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • Normcore offers free multiplayer capabilities for your Unity apps: I was recently taught that the makers behind Half + Half, a creative social VR experience, also offer a tool called Normcore. It’s for Unity developers to have everything they might need for a multiplayer application like avatars, voice, physics... It comes with a free tier and it’s pricing plan is quite inexpensive. [Link]

  • Aragon Court is the world’s first digital jurisdiction: Wait, what? A digital jurisdiction? For those who haven’t heard about Aragon, it’s a blockchain-based network and tool to create so called DAOs (Decentralized Autonomous Organizations). These can be organizations of any kind from a family unit to a government to a company. With Aragon, you can easily manage your group with the assurances of a blockchain that substitutes the bureaucracy from the old world. But what if there’s a dispute in an organization or between organizations? That’s where Aragon Court comes in. It’s a decentralized platform to handle these disputes in a manner very akin to traditional judiciary systems. I can’t wait to start creating and participating in XR communities that are DAOs. [Link]

  • Metachromium is an XR browser that can run multiple apps: Exokit has made another an interesting WebXR/OpenXR browser that supports running several apps at the same time. It also supports QR code detection which would make it work with crypto wallets. It’s still in development but I’m very excited as it can become a great way to prototype very ambitious XR applications. It’s the base application we need to build interconnected XR worlds. [Link]

  • Anytype.io is your home on the Internet where you control your data: It’s like Notion, but it becomes your homepage on the Internet while controlling all your data. It’s still in early access and I haven’t personally received an invite, so I can’t vouch for it. But there aren’t many privacy-based applications with a great UI, so I’m definitely interested. [Link]

  • Accounts for your web apps where people control their data with Userbase: It’s end-to-end encrypted and open sourced. Your users’ data is saved in the browser and accessed I guess using the PostMessage API. You can either host the server yourself or pay Userbase to make it serverless. I’ve built prototype identity systems following this model and I’m confident it’s the way forward for UX and privacy. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

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