Quest 2 is here and long live WebXR

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations, and communities.

Good morning, afternoon, or night! Quest 2 reached customers last week. I wrote my thoughts on Twitter about it. Love the screen clarity, big improvement there. But lots of people have ended up with a bricked device because Facebook blocked their accounts. Boz tried to justify it, but many of us just don’t agree.

It’s scary that an account we use for intimate moments defines if we can use a computing device or not. And that’s without getting into the privacy worries (we’ll do that down below). At least VR developers are seeing a very significant increase in sales.

On a lighter note, WebXR is doing great. I’ve discovered several creation tools this month. They’re still new and rough, but it’s a great start. I just hope they stay alive for long enough to reach mass usage. There are new WebXR experiences released as well, together with more Discord groups and newsletters that bring us together. I love the vibe in the community!

On the news

  • Filecoin launch on mainnet: It’s here. The $200M ICO from IPFS parent company Protocol Labs is live. FIL tokens have traded like crazy since. This is one of the most hyped launches in blockchains. For those unaware, it’s a decentralized hosting marketplace. IPFS is a decentralized HTTP where sites are hosted by different devices on the network. There was no easy way to make sure other computers were actually hosting your site, and that’s what Filecoin solves. [Link]

  • Hubs is ready for Halloween: As we can’t properly celebrate Halloween this year, the team from Hubs has decided to take it on themselves. They now offer different spooky scenes for you to host a Halloween party. They’ve also prepared a set of aptly themed avatars. And of course, anyone can create their own scene or avatar. Love the idea, though it would be fun to have some Halloween-related game options as well to have something to do. [Link]

  • Anonymized HMD data can still identify you in <5m: A paper from the Stanford VR lab proves that 6DoF tracking of both your head and hands is enough to identify a person. This would make that data count as biometric. This paper comes out at a timely moment with FB making mandatory logins on Quest with an increase in data collection. [Link]

  • Quest 2 is out and Game devs see a spike in sales: UploadVR posts a collection of tweets by VR developers. They report increases in sales by up to 10x on the day that Quest 2 launched. These are sales compared to the day before. More and more people know about Quest, and I think the Quest 2 will bring even more people into VR. I do suspect that growth will be limited by people’s fear of Facebook harvesting our data. It’s a pity they decided to enter this control zero-sum game. [Link]

Food for thought

  • Using VR for testing sessions: Jessica Outlaw, a well known Social VR researcher, wrote a post about conducting user testing sessions inside VR. She outlines the positive aspects of Social VR apps like Hubs for this use case. It lets you interact with global participants while guiding their attention to wherever necessary. VR is also a great environment for whatever kind of mockups that may need testing. [Link]

  • The history of MUDs: A worthwhile read (though quite long). It goes over the history of multiuser virtual worlds. They started in the early 70s, and though lacked graphics, they already showed the traits in current MMOs. In the end, these types of games bring in ideas that come from Dungeons & Dragons. I particularly liked hearing the story of games that didn’t prioritize fighting. It was more about socializing and living whatever life you wanted. Games started to deprioritize these features for the sake of simplicity. World of Warcraft was the first to prove that clear gameplay and fast action bring our basic instincts out, which produces more sales. I sure would like more Star Wars Galaxies like games to be popular again. [Link[

Cool Creations

  • Create voxel scenes for the Web: Daniel Esteban, who’s been working on multiuser WebXR voxel worlds, has now created a voxel scene editor. It comes with support for physics as well. [Link]

  • Wonderland, a WebXR development platform: Both a JS library and a development environment. Wonderland wants to make it easy to create high-quality WebXR applications. It’s already using technologies like WebGL 2 and WebAssembly. It’s still early days, but these tools won’t be created with a full feature set from one day to another. I hope it continues to evolve for a long time. [Link]

  • nunustudio is a three.js framework and IDE: Another interesting development environment. It takes care of many features by default like physics, audio, WebXR, and animations. They also offer a graphical editor to simplify workflows. [Link]

  • XR Garden is a relaxing WebXR experience: Ada from Samsung has created a new WebXR experience. This time it’s a sea garden with fishes roaming around and relaxing 360 music. I’ve tried it and can confirm: 100% relaxing. Brandon, from Google, suggests using the number of fishes the demo can show to be a new performance metric for WebXR. Let’s do it! (Spoiler: 70 on Quest, 370 on Quest 2 at 72Hz) [Link]

  • Hubs avatar creator: Rhiannan has created a neat simple tool to customize an avatar that can be imported into Hubs. It works for human-like shapes with multiple body and head customizations. You can also modify the clothing. [Link]

Interesting Meetups & Communities

  • Immersive Web Weekly: A newsletter created by Jordan Santell and now heralded by Trevor Flowers. Make sure to check it out to get a weekly dose of the latest things happening in the Immersive Web space. [Link]

  • WebXR Discord: Recently, a Discord server for the WebXR community has been gaining popularity. Make sure to stop by! [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

Facebook has officially made VR scary, but there's still light

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations, and communities.

Hey there! It’s been a while. And what a while. Covid is far from gone. We’re still dealing with the aftermath of the first quarantine and the second wave is already hitting us hard. We’re all dealing with it as best we can and I personally needed a break to engage with those I couldn’t see with lockdown in place. But it feels good to be reconnecting with online communities again.

The world didn’t stop and neither did the XR space. Many outsiders believe it was a missed opportunity. I tend to agree that we weren’t ready to receive as many users as we should have been. But this is still a very new ecosystem. The hardware, platform and apps still need more polishing. There are many problems we haven’t cracked yet.

That doesn’t mean it was a missed opportunity. I did see this crisis propel these 3 categories forward. Now we have the Quest 2 coming out with more advancements than we expected. Games continue to grow deeper. Remote work apps are pushing more and more features out. Social VR applications are getting much better and many physical events have tested them heavily. And that’s great. Some of these events are pretty big and the environments created for them wouldn’t have happened this soon without Covid.

I love the XR community. This sentiment became stronger as I saw how people showed up when Facebook continues to try to close off the platform. Facebook has a big lead over competitors and they’re trying to control the whole ecosystem. It’s not the digital platform most of us want. And it’s not the platform we believe would be beneficial for society. This is going to be our greatest struggle, but I have confidence that we’re ready to take it on.

On the news

  • Oculus Quest 2 with mandatory FB Login: At the now named Facebook Connect, they announced the new Oculus Quest 2. A better than expected update 1.5 years after the original. And it costs $100 less. Go and Rift S are now also discontinued. The controversy came with the mandatory FB account to use it. We all knew this would happen at some point, but that didn’t stop the fear. Facebook is so far ahead of competitors that there really is no other option for mainstream devices. They’re probably using this lead to force this on us. The decision triggered many developers to speak up about the times about negative interactions with Facebook. Two examples are BigScreen and Virtual Desktop, but many more on Twitter. I’ve linked to their Voices of VR podcast if you’re interested. I also posted a Twitter thread commenting on how Facebook by building a closed platform is making a zero-sum game. [Link[

  • Oculus buys Ready at Dawn: Another major VR developer gets acquired by Facebook. I can think of 2 reasons for why they are buying so many of the most successful VR game companies. The first is because these studios aren’t making enough money and buying them is a way to keep them alive producing great VR games. The second is to maintain exclusivity on their platform. Either way, having Facebook control so much of the VR platform limits creativity as all the big bucks are coming from a single common mind. VR is just starting and so many of us want to see all sorts of crazy experiments and feel free and safe while experiencing them. [Link]

  • Mozilla layoffs affect the WebXR team; Hubs continues: Mozilla has let go another 250 people which includes the WebXR team. They were the first proponent of the spec and one of the core teams pushing the needle. It’s very sad news and I wish the best for the team. The Hubs team continues for now and I hope they will continue for a long time. It’s probably the most important WebXR application everywhere. With Covid, many teams have used Hubs Cloud for work and events. [Link]

  • Epic takes Apple to court over 30% tax in the App Store: For some time now, Epic has been at war with App Stores. They’ve even launched their own, the Epic Store, which greatly reduces the percentage kept by the store for every sale. Now, Epic has gone to court to denounce antitrust practices. The developer community seems to, generally, back Epic. BigScreen brought Facebook into the mix, outlining how this 30% makes it impossible for them to be profitable while Facebook reduces the tax for Fandango and they themselves don’t need to pay it for their movie rental services. As mentioned in my Twitter thread above, these close platforms limit innovation and creativity by creating a zero-sum game. We don’t want future ecosystems to maintain this framework. [Link]

  • Frame continues to push updates: We’ve talked a lot about Hubs here, but Frame is another interesting multiuser WebXR tool. And these last few months they’ve continued to add new features and hire great WebXR developers. They’ve added things like drawing, a virtual whiteboard, and webcam support. They also have a virtual convention center coming soon with support for more simultaneous users. [Link]

  • SideQuest receives funding: From the likes of Boost VR, The Fund, and even Palmer Luckey, the team behind SideQuest has raised $650K. This is good news as we need alternatives to this close model. Robert Long, from Mozilla Hubs, is also offering $5K to anyone who can jailbreak a Quest 2. I love the VR community for things like this. We take these issues seriously, and we fight for the open platform that will make the ecosystem sustainable and beneficial for everyone. [Link]

  • Hiber raises $2.25M: An interesting platform that lets creators make their own 3D games on the Web has received a substantial amount of funding. Hiber has worked with WebXR for some time and we need more tools for creators to easily make content for the platform. Even if it looks rough around the edges right now, it was the same for Roblox 10 years ago, and look where they are now. [Link]

Food for thought

  • VR to examine Wikipedia and mind palaces: A VR & Philosophy podcast with Fabien Benetou recorded in his private Hubs Cloud. Fabien explains how he uses this instance for his mind palaces and how Wikipedia can look in VR. Spatial information is a passionate topic of mine. With an extra dimension, we’re bound to see new ways to transmit knowledge that makes it easier to be both understood and kept in memory. I love to see people experimenting with this. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • Run in StreetView with WebXR: Ruben van der Leun, a well known WebXR developer, showed on Twitter an unreleased running experience. It uses images from Google Streetview letting you go jogging around the world while in lockdown. [Link]

  • A platformer with WebXR: Feiss, while at Mozilla, has made a Lucky’s Tale-like level that works with WebXR. It’s more of an example for people to learn how to make these kinds of WebXR experiences. [Link]

  • Modbox, a VR game creation tool: In the same vein from as Dreams in PSVR, the team behind Modbox decided to relaunch with their 2.0 on September 9th adding desktop support. We’ll have to see if they’re able to attract creators like Dreams has been able to. But either way, we should expect to see more and more tools like until a few win the market. The Metaverse can only exist when every one of us can express ourselves and live how we want. [Link]

  • Mario Kart AR: A surprise announcement by Nintendo. It comes with a physical toy car that includes a camera. It’s controlled by a Nintento Switch and on the screen you see AR Mario Kart objects appear like coins or the objects you can throw. All of this in your living room. It looks like a really fun experience that can bring more AR to households today. [Link]

  • WebXR coding environment: Mr Doob has created a Glitch that’s a nice 3D coding environment. You’re in a nice (but small) apartment with a window that shows the code. Next to it is a real-time rendering of the code. This is what coding environments can look like today and no reason why they shouldn’t. With current VR headsets (including Quest 2), the resolution is now good enough to do it for at least an hour straight for many that can sustain the weight of the HMD. [Link]

Interesting Meetups & Communities

  • VR Toronto in Hubs: Due to Covid, they had to cancel the physical event and in its place, they organized a virtual event in a custom Hubs Cloud instance called The Flotilla. They counted on different collaborators who created other connected spaces in other platforms like JanusXR, Webaverse, or Altspace. Very impressive work by all the parties involved and I can’t wait to see more events like this. Mixing different collaboration tools and embracing the presence provided by VR takes us way further than just plain Zoom calls. [Link]

  • VR Festival: Folks behind the physical arts and music festival Shangri-La have teamed up with other companies to create Lost Horizon. It took place on 3-4 July with 4 stages. It worked from any device including VR headsets as it was done in Sansar. Again we see this pandemic forcing teams to get creative and embrace new technologies. VR concerts are definitely going to be a thing. The way creators can fuse music and art will produce shows for the ages. [Link]

  • Burning Man in VR: The pandemic also forced Burning Man to cancel their physical event this year. But that didn’t stop them from trying something new. They’ve used a mix of online tools including VR. Many Burning Man events occurred in different Social VR platforms including AltspaceVR. [Link[


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

Epic steals the show

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations, and communities.

Welcome y’all! Many parts of the world are starting to de-escalate from the severe quarantine we’ve all been living in. To be honest, it feels great to be able to go on a walk even if I still can’t see my friends and family. Things got bad here in Spain.

Moving on to the Metaverse where quarantine wasn’t a thing. There have been 2 main topics. One is the eternal “VR is dead” discussion. Do people even look at the numbers we have or even try any of the popular headsets?

But there’s little doubt that what everyone has been talking about is that incredible Unreal Engine 5 demo on a PS5. It shook the tech world. And it’s not just the graphic fidelity but the new pipeline it enables for content creators. Epic Games are dead serious about building the Metaverse.

On the news

  • Epic Games going at full throttle: The most talked about thing this week is Unreal Engine 5. It provides an important leap for creators, allowing you to just drop the highest quality assets and the engine itself will worry about loading it accordingly to each platform. But it’s also a giant leap in graphic quality, able to load these high-quality assets on next-gen consoles and high-end PCs with a new global illumination system. The video of a demo running on the PS5 has left us speechless.

    Retroactive to 2020, creators don’t need to start paying Epic until their first $1M in revenue, which is a great deal.

    If that wasn’t enough, the cross-platform online services they developer for Fortnite are now widely available. That means support for PCs and current-gen consoles. Mobile platforms are coming soon. An interesting feature is the unified cross-platform friend list. It’s also P2P and supports cloud game saves. Last but not least, the SDK is compatible with all the popular engines including Unity. [Link 1] [Link 2]

  • Spatial is free for some time due to the pandemic: A much talked about remote work solution can now be used unlimitedly. I haven’t had a chance to try it, but it supports all VR and AR headsets including the Quest, and can even be used from the browser. I’ve heard people mention the latter is quite buggy still. I’ve been quite excited about Spatial for a while as its features and possibilities seem to be ahead of its competition. [Link]

  • A new Oculus Quest could come sooner than expected: A Bloomberg report says that it was expected for the end of 2020 and has been pushed to early 2021. It will be a smaller and lighter headset with a more recent chipset that might mean an increased framerate. New controllers are also in the picture. I’m all in for this and can’t wait. The hardware gets better every year, and as long as they maintain software forward and backward compatibility, I couldn’t be more on board of higher frequent hardware updates. [Link]

  • Oculus Quest content reaches $100M and hand tracking available to all: Oculus just announced that all content sales have reached a whopping total of $100M. And that’s in under a year. Yes, VR is still niche. But it’s growing at an increasing pace. The Quest has changed the landscape and pushed VR forward several years. Hand tracking is now available with the latest update and there’s going to be more and more content on the store to support it. This is just one more way that Quest is becoming more accessible. [Link]

Food for thought

  • Joshua Topolsky replies to himself and the NYT, now a VR believer: He was one of those who couldn’t help write a sensationalist piece on “VR is dead”, but has now backtracked. After that NYT column which was written based on using an Oculus Go, Joshua dissected it explaining that you can’t have an opinion of the VR space without at least trying a Quest. He moves on to say that Quest has changed his perception of VR. An accessible and affordable device with decent content and the possibilities offered by 6DOF changes the market. This change in perception seems to be quite general. A lot of people in my Twitter feed that are not from the VR space now tweet frequently about VR thanks to Quest. [Link]

  • Benedict Evans suggests VR might be very far away from an “iPhone Moment”: It’s a different perspective from the status quo in the VR community. Benedict feels there are signs that VR, in its current form, has a hard cap in market share as a percentage of the gaming industry. It’s not a small market, but it’s on a different order of magnitude from PCs or smartphones. The main possible reason being the form factor. Maybe VR needs a neural implant or to become a slim pair of glasses that also does AR to fully become ubiquitous. He believes we don’t know what to build beyond games with VR’s current form factor while at the same time acknowledging that we’re waiting for better text legibility and input, and more comfortable headsets. These things seem likely to happen in <5 years and there is a clear path to them. Even text input if we use existing keyboards or our smartphones to type. The creativity in the VR space is vast and the bar for a decent VR application or game keeps on raising. Isolating ourselves from the world does have its cons, but in many situations, like the present quarantine, it also has many pros. An endless editable space is surely useful. It might be that we need a new approach to the hardware like the iPhone was to smartphones, but I have little doubt VR will be useful and move beyond games in the mid-term. [Link]

  • Bigscreen saves VC money for the long haul: In a short thread, Darshan, the CEO, comments they’ve been careful with hiring even though they received a total of $14M in investment rounds. The VR space is still far away from being a big market and reaching its “iPhone moment” so they’re taking a conservative approach to making sure they’re still here when the time comes. Darshan adds they still haven’t touched their Series A money. This is surely the best approach for a VR startup and I commend Darshan for thinking things thoroughly. [Link]

  • Vice made a short documentary on partying during quarantine: The reporter tries a whole bunch of different experiences from Zoom calls to Second Life to VR Chat. Even if VR Chat is weird and creepy often, this video proved to me, that at least for this use case, VR is ahead of all other existing options. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • WebXR locomotion tutorial: Ada, from Samsung, has written yet another useful tutorial for us WebXR peeps out there. This is a cool teleportation technique, from start to finish, using Three.JS, tween.js, and the WebXR API. It mimics the effect from Google Earth VR where you first select where you want to teleport, then the field of view shrinks and finally applies smooth locomotion to take you there. [Link]

  • Make presentations in WebXR with FRAME: You can make 3D scenes in the form of a presentation with multiuser support. Send a link and that’s it. [Link]

Interesting Meetups & Communities

  • Microsft MR Dev Days in Altspace: By simply registering beforehand you’ll be able to attend the whole event in Altspace. It makes total sense as they did buy Altspace, but it’s still great to see large corporations betting on VR for virtual conferences. Due to timezone problems, I hope to at least attend the keynote. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

Can VR grasp this opportunity?

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations and communities.

Events continue to move fully online and Metaverse prospective platforms are getting ready for it. This year’s edition of GDC has been the latest to move to a virtual format and Fortnite has broken records once again with a Travis Scott concert attended by 12.3M concurrent people. This is pushing the boundaries of different technologies and platforms in ways their makers hadn’t imagined or didn’t expect to happen so soon. There are some awesome examples in the newsletter today.

VR continues to grow at an increasing pace. Oculus Quest is now starting to become easier to find worldwide after the manufacturing shortages. I just hope we didn’t miss too much of the momentum behind Half Life: Alyx and the quarantine. But if we did and we missed this growth spike, the general trend is still looking great.

Read ahead for all the cool things people are making and saying. Stay safe, we’re here for the long haul!

On the news

  • Dreams PSVR support almost here: There are amazing creations in Dreams and the question on all our minds is when is it coming to PSVR. And the answer is real soon. It’s now in the last development phase. What seems like the best 3D/game creation tool will be greatly enhanced by VR native interactions. Amazing creation tools are the main missing link to make the Metaverse happen. [Link]

  • Late night talk show in Animal Crossing: People breaking boundaries yet again. A screenwriter from Star Wars, Gary Whitta, is launching a Twitch stream from Animal Crossing and talking over his character moving in the game. I love the creativity here, it’s definitely something I’m sure the creators of AC didn’t expect their game to be used for. It’s probably not the ideal platform for this, but it is the platform many are going to so they can relax a bit from quarantine life. [Life]

  • Mozilla Hubs Cloud is live: Extremely exciting feature from the Hubs team. Easy configuration of your own personalized Hubs server. It currently works only with AWS, but they’re working on Digital Ocean next. This is a major step for people to easily create their custom multiuser virtual environments. They have a stable product that’s been working great for a lot of use cases and now we can all build on top of it. [Link]

  • Finland holds a VR concert for 700k people in a virtual Helsinki: Their big May Day celebration in Helsinki was cancelled, so they turned to VR company Zoan that’s been building an exact virtual replica of Helsinki for 5 years. They organized a virtual concert in it with people acting live with a green screen. Attendees could even join in from a browser and use VR. This is one of the coolest and most polished uses of VR and virtual worlds that I’ve seen to date. It’s a glimpse into the future. [Link]

  • Steam users with a VR headset reaches 2M: Likely thanks to Half Life: Alyx, and possibly the quarantine, the percentage of Steam users with a compatible headset grew from 1.29% in March to 1.91% in April. This is roughly 2M users from a rough estimate made by UploadVR. It’s a really big increase in just one month, and many have been Oculus Quests. I expect this larger monthly growth numbers to keep up through the rest of the year as VR network effects and great content come into play. [Link]

Food for thought

  • The NYT asks itself why VR is still so niche during the covid crisis: The reporter attempts to try VR again, but was only able to grab hold of an Oculus Go. I also believe your first experience can make or break VR for you, and there’s not a lot of options on Go. Social VR also doesn’t do it for most of us, we don’t like talking with random people doing random things. He did enjoy relaxing apps like Nature Treks VR, which I’ve been using to disconnect during the quarantine too.

    The main answer for the VR market not growing faster is clearly not enough headsets being produced. It’s a shame this opportunity was missed, but there’s no way to fix that now. I’m still an optimist. The market continues to grow, the content is getting better and better and I have high hopes for the next 2 years. [Link]

  • Architects discuss the design of Half Life Alyx: In a recently uploaded live conversation, architects C. Fredrik V. Hellberg (Space Popular) & Andreea Ion Cojocaru (NUMENA) talk with Kent Bye about the architecture and design of Alyx. It’s a 2h long conversation that I’m sure will be worth your time. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • Stream into Zoom from Mozilla Hubs: Liv Erickson has built a green screen studio room and worked on a setup to stream into a Zoom call from it. It’s a great experiment aligned with the work done by SPACES, but from Hubs and more DIY. [Link]

  • Shopify experimenting with AR: They’ve recently launched a couple pretty cool experiments. One is size.link, which lets you set the sizes for a box and see how something of that size would look in your space. The other one is Wayfinding for stores. It’s really cool to see so many companies betting on the space. [Link]

  • Facebook working on VR text entry called PinchType: It’s a highly experimental system that only manages to reach 13 words per minute. But innovation on this front is still necessary. PinchType is based on assigning a group of letters to each finger, and you tap your fingers using finger tracking. A ML algorithm then detects, based on the context, which word you meant. [Link]

  • Aardvark lets you add AR widgets to your VR experiences: They’ve launched a Chromium-based application that loads what they call Gadgets made with their React library. Their application then loads these widgets into whatever VR applications you may be in. I haven’t had a chance to try it yet, but the video shows an example of Aardvark working with the SteamVR Home. I love the idea of integrating into existing apps seamlessly, that’s the right move to reach adoption. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

We're stuck at home for a while

Bi-weekly update with the latest insights from the Metaverse: news, posts, creations and communities.

I found a great meme today that said: “There are 15 days left. It doesn’t matter when you ready this”. We’ve been in strict confinement for over 5 weeks now here in Spain and it’s starting to feel that way. I hope everyone is well and I want to share my appreciation to all those doing their part to keep us safe and also those who keep us entertained.

It’s been a slow couple weeks news wise, but some really cool things have happened in the Metaverse. Take this birthday party in Hubs:

I’ve seen Zoom weddings, but Dan has definitely pushed Hub’s capabilities to have the best possible birthday while confined. Events continue to happen in VR, we’re still thinking about the hard problems and time continues to move forward. Read ahead some of the most interesting things I’ve found.

I wish you all the best and see you again soon!

Food for thought

  • Maybe Fortnite will organically evolve into the Metaverse: The Washington Post gets into the Metaverse conversation starting with Fortnite. It’s true that it’s the current popular place to hang out online, but I saw a great tweet that I can’t find that if Fortnite were to become mainstream, the cool kids would move on to another platform. I think most will agree that the Metaverse needs to be open for anyone to create what they need, and unless Fornite opens up and develops the creation tools, it will just be one other silo on the Internet. [Link]

  • Mixed Reality privacy threats: Diane Hosfelt at Mozilla has written a great document that summarizes the possible privacy threats from data collected by MR applications. She makes the important point that companies are not obliged to think about all the ethical issues around their products. It’s up to us to educate the public about the risks of using MR software an the danger is as high as it’s ever been. [Link]

  • Mozilla Hubs’ master plan: Greg Fodor has published on Medium an updated version of the ideas behind how Hubs is pushing for the open Metaverse. Based on a document previously on Github, it outlines how the Metaverse needs to make use of the Web’s features (URLs, cross-platform support..) and add some extra things like 3D creation tools and easy to set up servers to host our content. I’m confident on how well that team understands the needs of the platform. They always seem to be focusing on exactly the most important feature at each point in team. [Link]

Cool Creations

  • Unity WebXR exporter gets an update: It has been updated to support WebXR. This could be a great way for non-Web developers to get started with WebXR and easily publish their creations in a very accessible way. [Link]

  • Treasure hunt in Mozilla Hubs: They made a treasure hunt virtual world for their 6 year old niece. It’s a really creative use of Hubs and they ended up having a whole family experience, love it! [Link]

Interesting Meetups & Communities

  • Gamesbeat Summit 2020, talk on the Metaverse: Gamesbeat Summit is also moving to a digital format and will be hosting a talk on the Metaverse. Panelists will be Philip Rosedale of High Fidelity, Matthew Ball of Epyllion Industries, Raph Koster of Playable Worlds, Frederic Descamps of Manticore Games, and moderator Sam Englebardt of Galaxy Interactive. [Link]


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Thanks for tuning in, that’s it for today. If you find anything interesting that we should post in the next one, reach out via Twitter or Email.

See you in 2 weeks!

Alberto

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